Phineas Gage: Neuroscience’s Most Famous Patient | History & Archaeology | Smithsonian Magazine

Phineas Gage: Neuroscience’s Most Famous Patient | History & Archaeology | Smithsonian Magazine.

via Phineas Gage: Neuroscience’s Most Famous Patient | History & Archaeology | Smithsonian Magazine.

I first learned about Phineas Gage in my high school psychology class and it was my first exposure to a biological explanation for anti-social, even criminal, behavior. I personally think that for at least some, there may be a biological factor involved in making a criminal act easier; however, it people still know the difference between right and wrong and can make that choice. It would need to be treated on a case by case basis, of course, but imagine if we could help decrease the potential for a group of endangered people to commit crimes, such as people that rely heavily on overly processed food, or those living near factories that may put off heavy metals into the environment, or helping to increase Omega 3s for moms-to-be…

What are your thoughts on biological studies in criminology?

Why is this okay?

Son Sees The Man Who Killed His Mother

Why are people saying the victim’s son is right in doing what he has done and that it would be worth the jail time? Is it truly?

This is an example of retribution, which is the current model of the American criminal justice system. The system deems this is in fact, NOT okay. We do not support vengeance, lynching, etc… Others call it “taking the law into their own hands”. But what has this act of vengeance done? It put a mourning son in jail is what it did. I cannot speak for this boy’s mother but I’m sure she doesn’t want her son in jail. I’m sure she would rather see justice as best as possible in her absence – meaning this offender is in jail and prison, not her son.

Also, consider the possibility that the man accused is innocent? What then?

If the system itself deems what this boy did in retribution wrong, why doesn’t it also see it’s own methods as wrong since it seeks revenge?

What are some ways that restorative and transformative justice could have helped this son be able to cope?